Barnwell House

State-of-the-art office facilities in a location rich in aerospace history

The Project

Barnwell House, a new-build open plan office space designed to house Airbus’s UK engineering teams, was recently completed. The project included the design, build and fit-out of a new four-storey office building and energy centre to accommodate 2,350 staff. The building is some 90m square and is open plan, including 4 atria. 


Building Control

At design stage it was found that the application of Part B (Fire Safety) would be too limiting for the intended scale of the building. Through extensive consultation with Oculus, a BS 9999:2008 strategy was created by the design team which among other enhancements, enabled the use of much extended travel distances resulting fewer escape stairs than was originally anticipated.


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The 'Strong Wall' is 14 metres long, 10 metres high, 4.5 metres deep and has a total weight of 220 tonnes. It is made up of four modules and can be configured in two separate two module walls or a single four module wall. The mounting surfaces are machined to a close tolerance and when erected on the strong floor all points on the flange faces are within +/-1mm of a flat vertical plane. The structure is designed to cope with billions of load cycles so resistance to fatigue is the determining factor as well as its immense strength.

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