Burwalls House

an exciting conversion to create 5 impressive apartments and 4 new detached dwellings

The Project

The Burwalls site consists of a substantial historic Grade II listed main house and stable block annex and lies in nearly 5 acres of land adjacent to Brunel’s world famous Clifton Suspension Bridge. The main house is in the Jacobethan style and was constructed in 1872 as a private dwelling by Joseph Leech, a local entrepreneur and owner of the Bristol Times and Mirror.

The site was purchased in 2014 by Kersfield Developments who obtained permission to split the main house into 5 impressive apartments, convert the Stable block in to 2 units and for the construction of 4 new detached dwellings.

The main house has been extended at various points during its history and some of the current works in this sensitive conversion were to remove elements of the more recent additions which are detrimental to the original building.


Building Control

Whilst ensuring the Building Regulation requirements are adhered to, we have had to work very closely with the Architects and Contractor to ensure the requirements of other teams are met for the building to be returned to its original form and grandeur.

Due to the sensitivity and size of the building there has been a need for close discussions with Avon Fire and Rescue Service, who have been very helpful in agreeing a layout and provision for firefighting. The main issue being the distance Officers would need to travel within the building on arrival to an emergency in order to fight a fire. The agreed solution included a dry riser pipe allowing them to connect their apparatus on at either end, therefore avoiding the need to lay down extensive lengths of hose throughout the building. 


Architect – Nash Partnership

Contractor – Bray and Slaughter 

Images courtesy of  Nash Partnership

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