Burwalls House

an exciting conversion to create 5 impressive apartments and 4 new detached dwellings

The Project

The Burwalls site consists of a substantial historic Grade II listed main house and stable block annex and lies in nearly 5 acres of land adjacent to Brunel’s world famous Clifton Suspension Bridge. The main house is in the Jacobethan style and was constructed in 1872 as a private dwelling by Joseph Leech, a local entrepreneur and owner of the Bristol Times and Mirror.

The site was purchased in 2014 by Kersfield Developments who obtained permission to split the main house into 5 impressive apartments, convert the Stable block in to 2 units and for the construction of 4 new detached dwellings.

The main house has been extended at various points during its history and some of the current works in this sensitive conversion were to remove elements of the more recent additions which are detrimental to the original building.


Building Control

Whilst ensuring the Building Regulation requirements are adhered to, we have had to work very closely with the Architects and Contractor to ensure the requirements of other teams are met for the building to be returned to its original form and grandeur.

Due to the sensitivity and size of the building there has been a need for close discussions with Avon Fire and Rescue Service, who have been very helpful in agreeing a layout and provision for firefighting. The main issue being the distance Officers would need to travel within the building on arrival to an emergency in order to fight a fire. The agreed solution included a dry riser pipe allowing them to connect their apparatus on at either end, therefore avoiding the need to lay down extensive lengths of hose throughout the building. 


Architect – Nash Partnership

Contractor – Bray and Slaughter 

Images courtesy of  Nash Partnership

CASE STUDY
Tyntesfield

Tyntesfield is a spectacular Victorian Gothic Revival house with gardens, parkland and much more.  It had been the house of the Gibbs family for over 150 years. As the house was inherited by each generation of the Gibbs family, they stamped their own identity on the house and estate with different developments. The 14th June 2002 marked a new beginning for the house and estate when the National Trust announced their new acquisition.  The house was in need of extensive renovation and The National Trust set about re-roofing, re-wiring and re-plumbing the main house and generally improving access for visitor experience. 

Read More

CASE STUDY
National Museum of the Royal Navy

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 

Read More

CASE STUDY
Marwell Zoo

Intended to replace the existing Tropical World exhibit, the new Tropical House at Marwell Zoo aims to incorporate an Energy Centre using a sustainable energy source to power both the Tropical House, and other exhibits within the park. Animals such as sloths, monkeys and lizards will interact with visitors as they walk along a path through tropical themed environments of vegetation, waterfalls rock faces and aquariums.

Read More