Carlton Club, London

Oculus found solutions to satisfy the significant findings of the Fire Risk Assessment with minimal intervention and disruption to this very busy and prestigious establishment.

The Project

Following a fire risk assessment on the club, Oculus was brought in to find suitable solutions for fire safety works required in the significant findings of the report. With the club being a listed building any works would need to have minimal impact on the historic fabric and disruption to the guest accommodation in the Club kept to a minimum. 


Building Control

The major issues related to travel distances from the guest rooms and a passive fire protection would have involved major alteration works. After careful analysis of the possible options a fire suppression system was adopted and installed to overcome the problems relating to travel distance and fabric protection.  The fire suppression equipment and sprinkler heads were discretely located so as not to impact of the interior.

Other upgrading works and additional emergency exit signage were carried out to satisfy the fire risk assessment’s findings, again with minimal intervention.


The beautifully ornate plastering on the ceiling was produced by Lottie Radford - Bespoke Luxury Finishes

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