Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design

Stylish and multi-functional architecture to inspire creativity and flair

The Project

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios design has transformed two tired terraced buildings to a light and airy space reflecting the activities of the end user, Condé Nast College of Fashion.  The interior has been opened up creating a space and environment conducive to learning and reflecting the flair and creativity taking place as part of the education process.


The Approach

Working closely with architect, Oculus provided the building control services for a very fresh remodelling of the building for the Condé Nast College.  The fire strategy required a fire engineering approach undertaken by JGA Fire Engineers which met with the approval of Oculus and the LPEPA and allowing the design flexibility required to achieve the open spatial planning. The flat roof terrace forms an integral part of building use and creates an extension of the teaching areas. The façade of the building was cleverly upgraded and the interior brought together two buildings in the historic terrace with sensitive intervention.  A light and airy interior was the backdrop to the colourful, fashion-conscious fittings, fitments and activities.

This was a great example of tired buildings being given a vibrant new lease of life.


CASE STUDY
The Walronds, Cullompton

The Walronds is a Listed Grade 1 building erected in 1605. It was originally constructed as a dwelling house but has been used as a meeting house at ground floor level with a maisonette formed within the two floors immediately over the ground floor.  The building was on the English Heritage register of buildings at risk.  The proposal involved the renovation and conservation of the building which includes improvements to fire safety.

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CASE STUDY
Carlton Club, London

Following a fire risk assessment on the club, Oculus was brought in to find suitable solutions for fire safety works required in the significant findings of the report. With the club being a listed building any works would need to have minimal impact on the historic fabric and disruption to the guest accommodation in the Club kept to a minimum. 

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CASE STUDY
Astley Castle

A 12th-century fortified manor which had been lying in ruins since a fire in 1978, Astley Castle had seen additions and revisions carried out in almost every century since Medieval times. Throughout its history the site has been owned by no less than three Queens of England.

The Landmark Trust boldly set out to reinstate occupancy of Astley Castle in a manner appropriate for the 21st century.  After careful recording, those parts of the building beyond pragmatic repair were taken down.  By inserting a groundbreaking modern holiday home into the shell of the ancient castle, the architects, Witherford Watson Mann, were able to both stabilise the ruin and create the next layer of the building’s history.  The results showcase how modern architecture can be unashamedly but sympathetically stitched into ancient fabric to significant effect.

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