Farmiloe Building - London

a spectacular Grade II listed Victorian building

The Project

This spectacular Grade II listed Victorian building nestled in the borough of Islington was formerly a glass and leadworks completed in 1868 and owned by the Farmiloe family. For the past decade the building has been used as a filming location for movies such as Dark Knight, Inception and Sherlock Holmes as well as an event space.


Building Control

Oculus was appointed early in the design process for the Farmiloe building to assist the Design Team on Building Regulations related matters.

The retention of the listed Victorian building was an essential part of the project. The aim was to retain as much of the historic fabric as possible. The historic structure will be complimented by a new extension which will fully respect the host building in both design and materials.

The construction works are being carried out by Wates and are at an early stage. One knows that high quality design and construction is going to result in high quality office accommodation.


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