National Museum of the Royal Navy

Sensitively enriching a building accessible to all

The Project

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 


Building Control

Oculus were pleased to have provided the building control services for recent works providing a glazed link to Storehouse 11 and expanding ground floor exhibition space. The project aimed to enrich the visitor experience of the history of the Royal Navy and our maritime past, enhancing the existing building without compromising the historic fabric or setting. The architects, Purcell, retained all the important features of this large, robust listed structure which now comfortably accommodates a superb range of exhibits, displays and interactive experiences. Oculus worked closely with Purcell and Hampshire Fire & Rescue Service to agree solutions to challenging fire safety issues. Modern fire safety features were discretely installed without impacting on the appearance of the historic interior.  Access was also improved to ensure the experience could be enjoyed universally by all visitors.


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