National Museum of the Royal Navy

Sensitively enriching a building accessible to all

The Project

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 


Building Control

Oculus were pleased to have provided the building control services for recent works providing a glazed link to Storehouse 11 and expanding ground floor exhibition space. The project aimed to enrich the visitor experience of the history of the Royal Navy and our maritime past, enhancing the existing building without compromising the historic fabric or setting. The architects, Purcell, retained all the important features of this large, robust listed structure which now comfortably accommodates a superb range of exhibits, displays and interactive experiences. Oculus worked closely with Purcell and Hampshire Fire & Rescue Service to agree solutions to challenging fire safety issues. Modern fire safety features were discretely installed without impacting on the appearance of the historic interior.  Access was also improved to ensure the experience could be enjoyed universally by all visitors.


CASE STUDY
Carlton Club, London

Following a fire risk assessment on the club, Oculus was brought in to find suitable solutions for fire safety works required in the significant findings of the report. With the club being a listed building any works would need to have minimal impact on the historic fabric and disruption to the guest accommodation in the Club kept to a minimum. 

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Gloucester Cathedral

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CASE STUDY
Burwalls House

The Burwalls site consists of a substantial historic Grade II listed main house and stable block annex and lies in nearly 5 acres of land adjacent to Brunel’s world famous Clifton Suspension Bridge. The main house is in the Jacobethan style and was constructed in 1872 as a private dwelling by Joseph Leech, a local entrepreneur and owner of the Bristol Times and Mirror.

The site was purchased in 2014 by Kersfield Developments who obtained permission to split the main house into 5 impressive apartments, convert the Stable block in to 2 units and for the construction of 4 new detached dwellings.

The main house has been extended at various points during its history and some of the current works in this sensitive conversion were to remove elements of the more recent additions which are detrimental to the original building.

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