National Museum of the Royal Navy

Sensitively enriching a building accessible to all

The Project

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 


Building Control

Oculus were pleased to have provided the building control services for recent works providing a glazed link to Storehouse 11 and expanding ground floor exhibition space. The project aimed to enrich the visitor experience of the history of the Royal Navy and our maritime past, enhancing the existing building without compromising the historic fabric or setting. The architects, Purcell, retained all the important features of this large, robust listed structure which now comfortably accommodates a superb range of exhibits, displays and interactive experiences. Oculus worked closely with Purcell and Hampshire Fire & Rescue Service to agree solutions to challenging fire safety issues. Modern fire safety features were discretely installed without impacting on the appearance of the historic interior.  Access was also improved to ensure the experience could be enjoyed universally by all visitors.


CASE STUDY
Wessex Water, Bath

The client, Bennetts Associates Architects and Buro Happold Consulting Engineers created the most energy efficient and sustainable building in the country with the highest BREEAM rating at that time for a commercial office building. In environmental terms the project was acclaimed by the Building Research Establishment as the ‘greenest’ commercial building in the UK. It stands as an exemplary example of energy efficiency, low embodied energy, recycling including aggregate for the concrete structure and recycled storm and grey water and enhanced biodiversity. 

Read More

CASE STUDY
Tyntesfield

Tyntesfield is a spectacular Victorian Gothic Revival house with gardens, parkland and much more.  It had been the house of the Gibbs family for over 150 years. As the house was inherited by each generation of the Gibbs family, they stamped their own identity on the house and estate with different developments. The 14th June 2002 marked a new beginning for the house and estate when the National Trust announced their new acquisition.  The house was in need of extensive renovation and The National Trust set about re-roofing, re-wiring and re-plumbing the main house and generally improving access for visitor experience. 

Read More

CASE STUDY
University of Hertfordshire

  • Refurbishment and alterations of the Hutton Building and Hutton Hall, including multi-storey new-build Hutton-Hub student zone.
  • Refurbishment and extension of Prince Edward Hall.

To the design of Vincent and Gorbing and construction by Contractor Morgan Sindall in association with Stride Treglown as executive architects , the works included an extensive refurbishment of Prince Edward Hall to form a new Learning Zone and Refreshment Space. The end result is a stylish timber lined informal study and meeting area for students adjacent to a new café and seating area. Externally the building has been granite clad.

Read More