Shakespeare's New Place / Nash's House

"a major new heritage landmark attraction"

The Project

Spearheaded by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, a new oak and bronze gateway was created that opens on the original threshold of Shakespeare's New Place. This new permanent exhibition brings to life the story of Shakespeare's New Place and the personal life of its most famous occupant, and where he had his family home for 19 years. 


The Approach

The project benefited greatly by having a client who was passionate and enthusiastic about their historic building, and  also, how the building was to be presented to visitors for their enjoyment and education. The building was extended sensitevely paying respect to the host fabric. Nash's House has the majority of its original fabric and features, so to make the building suitable for public access and safety, a challenging fire strategy had to be carried out with descrete intervention and respect for the historic fabric. 

The landscape pays homage to the birthplace of Shakespeare with thought provoking features and related elements. 


Learn more about Shakespeare's Birthplace 

CASE STUDY
Prior Park College, Bath

The building will provide state-of the-art sports facilities for students and the general public, and has facilities catering for badminton, tennis, netball, volleyball, basketball, table tennis, five-a-side football and hockey practice. There are also classrooms, a fitness suite, changing facilities and a viewing balcony over the cricket & rugby pitches.

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CASE STUDY
Shakespeare's New Place / Nash's House

Spearheaded by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, a new oak and bronze gateway was created that opens on the original threshold of Shakespeare's New Place. This new permanent exhibition brings to life the story of Shakespeare's New Place and the personal life of its most famous occupant, and where he had his family home for 19 years. 

Read More

CASE STUDY
National Museum of the Royal Navy

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 

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