Tyntesfield

visitor experience without compromising conservation

The Project

Tyntesfield is a spectacular Victorian Gothic Revival house with gardens, parkland and much more.  It had been the house of the Gibbs family for over 150 years. As the house was inherited by each generation of the Gibbs family, they stamped their own identity on the house and estate with different developments. The 14th June 2002 marked a new beginning for the house and estate when the National Trust announced their new acquisition.  The house was in need of extensive renovation and The National Trust set about re-roofing, re-wiring and re-plumbing the main house and generally improving access for visitor experience. 


The Approach

Oculus were pleased to have provided the building control services for this prestigious project. Working closely with Tim Cambourne, Senior Surveyor with the National Trust, architects Rodney Melville & Partners and Avon Fire & Rescue Service, solutions were agreed to provide good access to the majority of the showrooms, with minimal intervention into the historic fabric. All upgrading works were sensitively handled as part of the major renovations.

A project in which The National Trust engaged with visitors throughout the renovation programme providing a viewing platform from which to observe the extensive re-roofing works. There was also a training programme for apprentices to develop skills in traditional construction crafts.

Oculus were pleased to work with The National Trust providing the building control services on the estate including:

  • Sawmill project (Learning Centre)
  • Visitor Centre and Restaurant
  • Orangery
  • Stable (accommodation)

Tyntesfield provides a superb experience for families.


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