Educating the future

As part of an ongoing commitment to education Peter Norris and Steve Burridge lecture on various courses for the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at the University of Bath. By way of encouragement and reward Oculus awards three prizes annually.

Oculus supports education and encourages excellence for the future of architecture and conservation

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MSc Course - Conservation of Historic Buildings

Peter Norris has been lecturing on this course for over 18 years and has a particular interest and passion for historic buildings. From 2007 Oculus Building Consultancy has presented an annual prize of £250 to the highest performing student successfully completing the course.

2017 Recipient - Eleanor Atherton

The winner of the 2017 Oculus sponsored prize was awarded to Eleanor Atherton.

Previous recipients

  • 2016 Recipient - Shradha Arora 
  • 2015 Recipient - Zachary Osborne
  • 2014 Recipient - Jonathan Vining
  • 2013 Recipient - Judith Mosley
  • 2012 Recipient - Sophie Rahm
  • 2011 Recipient - Emma Green
  • 2010 Recipient - Sam Hale
  • 2009 Recipient - Vanicka Arora
  • 2008 Recipient - James Russiello
  • 2007 Recipient - James Hall

 

 

Architectural Studies Course

The Oculus Team lecture to 4th Year undergraduates studying for a BSc in General Architectural Studies at the University of Bath and provide one to one studio tutorials.  Peter Norris lectures to students on the 6th Year March course and provides one to one studio tutorials. The aim is to ensure that graduates are well versed in the implications of the Building Regulations when they join the construction industry.

By way of encouragement and reward since 2008 Oculus has presented an annual prize of £250 to Second Year students for the ‘Detail Design' Unit of the Architectural Degree Course. The recipients of the prize are selected by Teaching Fellow Dyfed Griffiths of the University. 

2017 Recipient - Maddi Gomez-Iradi

Previous recipients

  • 2016 Joint Recipients - Jasmine Chung & Adam Price
  • 2015 Recipient - Shankar Mall
  • 2014 Recipient - Megan Cumming
  • 2013 Recipient - Jakub Ryng
  • 2012 Recipient -   Devant Asawla 
  • 2011 Recipients - Agnieszka Zielke & Christopher Jones
  • 2010 Recipient -   Daniel Holmes
  • 2009 Recipient -   Phai C Vittayavarakorn
  • 2008 Recipients - 1st Prize Nathan Ovens & Runner Up Marta Ferreira

The Oculus European Study Trip Project Prize

Since 2011 has provided a prize of £500 shared between the winners from the 3rd Year BSc architectural course.

RIBA Professional Practice Part III

Peter Norris lectures annually on the Building Regulations and associated legislation at the University of Bath for Course Director Dyfed Griffiths.

Publications:

Historic Building Conservation series of books published by Wiley Blackwell and edited by Dr Michael Forsyth, University of Bath

Peter Norris is a contributing author on the Structure & Construction and Interior Finishes & Fittings volumes.

CASE STUDY
Wessex Water, Bath

The client, Bennetts Associates Architects and Buro Happold Consulting Engineers created the most energy efficient and sustainable building in the country with the highest BREEAM rating at that time for a commercial office building. In environmental terms the project was acclaimed by the Building Research Establishment as the ‘greenest’ commercial building in the UK. It stands as an exemplary example of energy efficiency, low embodied energy, recycling including aggregate for the concrete structure and recycled storm and grey water and enhanced biodiversity. 

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CASE STUDY
Astley Castle

A 12th-century fortified manor which had been lying in ruins since a fire in 1978, Astley Castle had seen additions and revisions carried out in almost every century since Medieval times. Throughout its history the site has been owned by no less than three Queens of England.

The Landmark Trust boldly set out to reinstate occupancy of Astley Castle in a manner appropriate for the 21st century.  After careful recording, those parts of the building beyond pragmatic repair were taken down.  By inserting a groundbreaking modern holiday home into the shell of the ancient castle, the architects, Witherford Watson Mann, were able to both stabilise the ruin and create the next layer of the building’s history.  The results showcase how modern architecture can be unashamedly but sympathetically stitched into ancient fabric to significant effect.

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CASE STUDY
Airbus - AWIC

The new £40m Aircraft Wing Integration Centre is arranged to maximise opportunities for departments to share spaces, equipment and ideas and will provide an innovative, highly flexible and easily adaptable physical test environment that forms a proving ground for the future technologies. This includes Airbus’ Wings of tomorrow programme, part of which focuses on exploring how wings can be more efficient, lighter and easier to make and assemble, looking at the best materials to use, assembly techniques and new technologies in aerodynamics and wing architecture. Covering 9,050m2 the scheme comprises hangar facilities including a 'Strong Floor' and relocatable ‘Strong Wall’, a high capacity hydraulic system to power multiple test rigs, three overhead cranes, laboratories, testing control rooms and open plan offices. As this facility is to be used to develop new technologies it was clearly important to build in flexibility for future uses. The delivery team was involved through this period and translated the design development into physical form with the same mind-set.

The ‘Strong Floor’ itself is 40 metres long by 18 metres wide and is housed within a building over 25 metres tall to allow the testing of full size wings from the largest Airbus aircraft including long term fatigue testing. A total of 1,440 cubic metres of concrete was used for the floor which took some 23 hours to cast to a total depth of two metres. The steel reinforcement amounted to a total of approximately 280 tonnes of rebar, estimated to be around 54 km laid end-to-end.

The 'Strong Wall' is 14 metres long, 10 metres high, 4.5 metres deep and has a total weight of 220 tonnes. It is made up of four modules and can be configured in two separate two module walls or a single four module wall. The mounting surfaces are machined to a close tolerance and when erected on the strong floor all points on the flange faces are within +/-1mm of a flat vertical plane. The structure is designed to cope with billions of load cycles so resistance to fatigue is the determining factor as well as its immense strength.

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