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Castle Drogo - Phase 2

making England's last castle watertight

The Project

Oculus have been involved in the extensive works been done throughout Castle Drogo since 2013. The Grade 1 listed castle in Devon was constructed of granite and built between the years of 1911 and 1930, and designed by Edwin Lutyens. Castle Drogo was the last castle to be built in England.


Building Control

The castle is part way through a series of repairs which are expected to take around 5 years. The recent Phase 2 works were to make the building watertight, carry out structural repairs and improve the fire safety of the building, costing in the region of £5 million. The building suffered from extensive water damage for years where the roof leaked, where pointing was inadequate and around windows. These works addressed these issues by meticulously removing the battlements and resealing the roof before re-installing these elements as well as replacing rotten timbers which had been saturated over time. In a large number of areas the outer skin of granite had to be removed in order to install damp proofing measures to prevent moisture bridging through from the outside, a common problem on an exposed Devon hilltop.

Inside the building there was a new fire strategy devised and implemented which included a new fire alarm and detection system throughout.

Oculus are delighted to soon be working with the team again on Phase 3 of the project, this will incorporate the final sections of the building not yet upgraded and will result in a much safer, much improved and watertight building. 


Photos Courtesy of National Trust

CASE STUDY
Castle Drogo - Phase 2

Oculus have been involved in the extensive works been done throughout Castle Drogo since 2013. The Grade 1 listed castle in Devon was constructed of granite and built between the years of 1911 and 1930, and designed by Edwin Lutyens. Castle Drogo was the last castle to be built in England.

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CASE STUDY
Astley Castle

A 12th-century fortified manor which had been lying in ruins since a fire in 1978, Astley Castle had seen additions and revisions carried out in almost every century since Medieval times. Throughout its history the site has been owned by no less than three Queens of England.

The Landmark Trust boldly set out to reinstate occupancy of Astley Castle in a manner appropriate for the 21st century.  After careful recording, those parts of the building beyond pragmatic repair were taken down.  By inserting a groundbreaking modern holiday home into the shell of the ancient castle, the architects, Witherford Watson Mann, were able to both stabilise the ruin and create the next layer of the building’s history.  The results showcase how modern architecture can be unashamedly but sympathetically stitched into ancient fabric to significant effect.

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CASE STUDY
National Museum of the Royal Navy

Storehouse 10 at the historic naval dockyard in Portsmouth was constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, during an upsurge in naval building prompted by events such as the Seven Years War. It was originally used to store everyday supplies for working ships plus some naval items.

During the Second World War, Storehouse 10 was hit by an incendiary bomb, which destroyed the clock tower and most of the roof and upper floors. More extensive damage was prevented due to a strenuous firefighting effort to save the radar sets within, which were to be some of the first installed in Royal Navy ships.

Restoration of Storehouse 10 was gradual and was eventually completed in 1992. It has now been converted to form part of the National Museum for the Royal Navy complex. 

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